Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Our local Boy Scout's and an update on previous issues.

   For years I quietly shied away from donating to the Boy Scouts of America. Locally, the Boy Scouts consistently received a far greater share of money from larger umbrella charity groups than the Girl Scouts received. On a national level, I strongly disagree with the Boy Scouts' stand to prohibit gays from joining troops or serving as adult leaders.
   But when Mike Wetzel suggested that Sunrise Ford pay for tickets so that the members of Boy Scout Troop 772 attend a Dolphins game last season, I didn't object. Scott Van Duzer's latest project---to establish a troop for at risk adolescent boys attending Dan McCarty Middle School---is one I strongly endorse. Scouting has always had a large appeal to middle class families who can afford the uniforms, volunteer for activities and guide the youngsters through the merit badge and Eagle Scout programs. It's not easy for the struggling poor or the disenfranchised to come up with the time or money --- or even motivation ---to encourage their sons to join the Boy Scouts
   Van Duzer's Scout Troop 772 initially attracted 51 students who wanted to sign up. The troop has more than 20 members whose expenses are funded by donations. Community leaders volunteer to serve as scout leaders. For many scouts in troop 77, their scout leader likely is the most influential male model in their lives. The hope is that scouting will encourage these 12 and 13 year olds to continue their education and instill the self esteem and good sense so they will avoid gangs, drive by shootings, and other crimes that have become way too prevalent in our area.
Troop 772 has drawn many supporters and donors, but still has some bumps to overcome. Already some of the scouts have been disciplined and even been suspended for violating school rules or scouts' policies. But I am hopeful that this program will be one that sticks.
   Two other developments have also helped me overcome my reluctance to donate to the Boy Scouts. Three months ago, the Boy Scouts of America allowed gay boys to join the scouts. And Van Duzer has shown that he is an equal opportunity philanthropist. He is now establishing a scouting troop for disadvantaged girls.


A couple updates:
   The last blog I wrote detailed the arduous and emotionally draining time I had as a plaintiff in a medical malpractice case against the local doctors who failed to diagnose the breast cancer that eventually spread to my lymph nodes and ended up as stage 3 cancer.
   One of the disadvantages in filing such a suit is the state imposed a limit on what can be collected in such uneconomic damages. In many cases, a single plaintiff could not collect more than $500,000 in such damages, no matter how severe the pain, anguish, and devastating effects that were caused by the malpractice.
   Last week the Florida Supreme Court ruled that the cap on malpractice cases were unconstitutional. the 2003 law, pushed by former Gov. Jeb Bush, was supposed to prevent a "malpractice crisis" which would drive doctors out of Florida. But a majority of the Supreme Court judges rules there was "no rational basis" to substantiate such a crisis and, in fact, the number of physicians in Florida was increasing not decreasing during the "alleged crisis."
   Many plaintiffs who have files suits in recent years have delayed going to trial or settling cases waiting for the Supreme Court ruling. I chose to go ahead and settle, figuring that dragging it out would cause more stress. My attorney told me that there was an average of 80 malpractice cases filed in the state of Florida each year. There are now approximately 700 pending cases in the system. A 2007 study by FSU estimated there are 34,000 physicians practicing in Florida
   By my count, that means that .02 doctors in the state are being sued for malpractice. Like the Florida Supreme Court said-not exactly a crisis.


Last year, I wrote that Sen. Joe Negron was pushing to reduce the fees to register vehicles. He proposed to offset the state losses by closing a tax loophole enjoyed by insurance companies in Florida who received a tax credit equal to 15 percent of their payroll expenses. To no one's surprise, the insurance industries lobbied hard against Negron's bill and it failed.
  This year, with the state expecting $1.2 billion surplus, Negron once again submitted a bill that would cut the cost of re-registering a vehicle by $25. The average cost is now about $70. This time the cut was not tied to the insurance industry and it easily passed the Senate this week and is expected to be approved by the House and enacted into law. Rental companies and businesses with large fleets will see the largest windfalls from this bill, but Negron also hopes it will help all Florida Families.
   As a car dealer, I was a big proponent of Negron's bill last year and still think its a good idea. But it will not affect the much heftier increase the state imposed a few years ago---increasing the registration of new vehicles from $200 to $450. And this bill will cost the state 309 million in lost revenue next year and $400 million in subsequent years. Gov. Rick Scott, buoyed by the budget surplus and worried about an upcoming election, is proposing $500 million in tax cuts and reduction in fees.
   One state legislator figured that would amount to $25 for each Florida resident. "Enough to buy a cheap $25 shirt made in China," he said. This may have been the one opportunity when two Republicans ---Negron and Scott---could have been true heroes to all Florida environmentalists and most Treasure Coast Taxpayers who have been fighting for the salvation of the Indian River Lagoon.
   Could that surplus have been put to better use by completing the reservoirs and buying Big Sugar's land? That would be a substantial start to the big fix. Just something for Negron and Scott to think about. A huge down payment towards restoring the Everglades seems like a much better legacy than a cheap Chinese-made shirt.

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Get a Second Opinion

With all the recent controversy surrounding Obamacare, several aspects of the
new law are not getting much press. Few realize that Obamacare was based on
recommendations made years ago by the Hertage Foundation, a conservative
Republican think tank, that wanted people to take responsibility for their health
care costs by mandating that they enroll in a health insurance program. Secondly,
Obamacare includes tort reform, putting limits on damages awarded in medical
malpractice lawsuits.

The pundits don't talk much about Obamacare's tort reform, because most people
including myself, figure that they will never be in the position of suing your
doctor. But I was certainly wrong about that. And what I learned was a real
eye-opener. Here is my story:

In early 2009, I felt a lump in my right breast and immediately scheduled a
visit with Dr. McNaney-Flint of Stuart, who had been my gynecologist for
more than 20 years. After an examination, she declared that the lump was not
cancerous. The ultrasound, that was done on February 3, 2009 at radiology
imaging in Fort Pierce, was normal, she said, and with great relief I left her
office believing I dodged a big bullet. But as time went on, the lump grew and
I became more concerned. I saw Dr. McNaney-Flint two more times that year and each
time she assured me everything was fine.

By the end of the year, I scheduled another mammogram even though my regular
appointment was two months away. That mammogram was anything but normal. I had a
large malignant tumor that spread to my lymph nodes. Dr. Denise Sanderson, who
performed the double mastectomy, said the tumor was one of the biggest she had ever
seen and she was unable to get clear margins, which meant cancer likely was in some
tissue. Eight of the 12 lymph nodes she remove the cancerous. A tough regiment of
chemotherapy followed, leaving me nauseated, bald and tired. Radiation was worse
than I expected. Thirty-two days of intense treatments left a painful burn that went through
the skin of my right chest.

Despite all that, I feel fortunate. The cancer had not metastasized. I had the
financial resources for all the treatments, tests and appointments. Since I own
my own business, I do not have to worry about being penalized for losing work. I
had the support my husband, my best friend, my family and hundreds of others who
have my hand through the ordeal. Still, I felt betrayed by the doctors
misdiagnosed me.

I decided to sue Dr. McNaney-Flint and Radiology Imaging for malpractice. The suitwasn't only about the money. I just didn't want anyone else to go through what I
just endured. And to make matters worse, when I underwent reconstruction surgery
in November 2010, the surgeon found more cancer in a lymph node. I once again
had to make the trek to Palm Beach Cancer Institute for a second round of
chemotherapy and radiation treatments.

I put the malpractice case on hold until I knew I had the energy to lunch what I
knew would be another test of endurance and determination. Just as I was shocked
to learn I had stage 3 cancer, I was almost as disturbed about malpractice laws
in the state of Florida-- tort reform laws that are similar to those in
Obamacare. Statute of limitations for malpractice is two years so I knew I was
now on a tight deadline to get an attorney and get the suit filed in a timely
manner. Secondly, there is a $500,000 cap on non economic damages, which means it
was unlikely there would be any large sums involved in my case. And finally many
doctors are "judgment proof" which means that their personal assets are
set-aside in trusts or in family members names so they cannot be attached to a
verdict or settlement.

My attorney explained that any money recovered would likely be from the physicians
malpractice insurance, which also is limited. I decided to go ahead with the
suit, even though I knew it would mean lawyers prying not only into my medical
records, but every other aspect of my life that could affect the case. I spent
weeks tracking down documents they subpoenaed--everything for my college diploma
to the amount of money spent on the wigs I needed. Even before the actual suit
was filed, I had to give an "unsworn statement" to the doctors attorneys. Under
not so gentle questioning, I had to relive what I have been through the past
year--the surgeries, the treatments and emotional toll it had on me, as well as
my family and friends.

Shortly after that session, Dr. McNaney-Flint decided to settle. We came to an
agreement quickly, but the case against radiology imaging dragged on for more
than a year. More subpoenas, more record gathering and then another lengthydisposition, which at times was almost as brutal as the cancer treatments.

I watched as the radiologist where deposed -- irritated that none seemed
the least bit remorseful. Earlier this year, we all went to mediation, and after
hours of haggling, decided to settle with Dr. Lloyd Heilman the radiologist
who reviewed the ultrasound on my right breast on February 3, 2009. Despite the
palpable lump, he said there was no evidence of cancer. "Benign finding
recommended yearly screening mammography" was what he wrote on his report. How
wrong he was.

I'm glad it was over--even though the settlement cannot begin to compensate me
for the pain, anguish anxiety caused by the misdiagnosis. I now have a blood
test every three months and a PET scan every six months to make sure the cancer
has not returned. And the case did not end with the settlement.

My attorney got her 30% plus expenses and the referring attorney got his 10%.
And then I learned the state of Florida let someone else take a share of what
was left. Blue Cross Blue Shield placed a lien on the money, because it claimed it
had to pay for treatments that might not have been needed if I had been
diagnosed properly. They wanted more than $200,000, but settled for less. Most of
what was left was donated to Learn to Read of St. Lucie County.

The constitutionality of putting caps on malpractice awards is now pending before the
Florida Supreme Court. In fact, a circuit judge in this district has also ruled there should be no caps on malpractice damages in a case which coincidentally involved the same gynecologist that settled with me.

Republican legislators, like a majority of Florida legislators, are consistently big
proponents of tort reform. So I'm surprised that so many referred to Obamacare
as socialism. Here is a plan that provides monetary protection for doctors who
are being sued. It also requires those who can afford health insurance to pay
for it so taxpayers and hospitals won't be on the hook for emergency room and
other hospital expenses for the uninsured. And the state of Florida lets big
business the one step further by allowing insurance companies to place liens on
what damages are awarded.

So here's my advice. If you question the doctors diagnosis, get a second opinion.
If you think we need more tort reform for malpractice, think again. A
devastating misdiagnosis could happen to you. And if you think Obamacare is just
another one of our presidents socialistic plots, remember where the law
originated---in meetings held in 1989 by some of our country's most conservative
leaders.



Monday, September 16, 2013

Ford F150s Buzzing through Paris? Maybe...

     When I returned from a mother-daughter trip to Europe this month, I was pleased to see an article in the New York Times proclaiming that the Ford F150 pickup truck remains the top selling vehicle in the United States. The Times' Sunday Magazine, which was devoted to pop culture, lists the F150 as a country's most popular ride.
    
     The popularity does not transcend to Europe. In the eight days I was in France and Hungry, I did not see the first place F150. Sure there were plenty of Ford Focuses -- and lots of new C-max hybrids but no Ford pickups. For decades Europeans have preferred those smaller and more gas efficient cars and trucks. And it's no wonder, gas prices hovering between $9 and $10 a gallon. One could only imagine what would happen here if we're forced to lay out that much money at the gas pump. Major elections has hinged on gas prices. Not that long ago, in the days of rationing and OPEC bullying, there were long lines, fist fights and protests. But to Europeans those hefty prices have been a way of life for decades. And they have adjusted their lifestyle so a big chunk of their income is not going to global gas companies.
    
     The parking lot at the main train station in Amsterdam is a multilayered structure filled with thousands of bikes whose owners have hopped aboard a high-speed train to get to their destination. In Italy, priority parking spaces are reserved for electric cars. When I was jogging in Paris, I saw a large motorcade of heads of state arriving at a city building for reception. Not a black, tinted window Suburban in sight. These dignitaries were escorted by motorcycles and their vehicles of choice was the modest Citroen.
    
     Even the large oil-producing countries, such as Norway, don't give their drivers a break. A gallon of gas there goes for $9.97 and the oil profits are earmarked for free college tuition for Norway students and for improvement to its infrastructure. Even with those high gas prices, Norway is ranked the second happiest country in the world, according to a recent report by Columbia University's Earth Institute. By contract, United States, with its great wealth and comparably low taxes and gas prices, was ranked 16th.
    
     We are making strides here with more gas efficient cars and trucks. Ford his rolled out it's electric Focus which costs the equivalent of 1 gallon of gas per 100 miles. The C-Max Hybrid and the Hybrid Fusion each average 43 miles per gallon. And the ever popular Ford pickup? With the eco-boost engine it now gets 21 miles per gallon, with better towing and torque features.
    
     During my 20 year tenure at Sunrise Ford, I have also noticed the difference. In the mid-1990s we were selling five trucks for every car sold. Now we sell twice as many cars a month as F150s. 20 years ago, Expeditions were a top seller. Now we sell less than a handful a month.
    
     Still, it has taken a long time for Americans -- and the US automobile industry -- to come to grips that we need to curtail our use of fuel. The "drill baby drill" sentiment is still strong -- even though the oil drilled in the United States will be exported globally to the highest bidder and will do nothing to bring gas prices down here. Politician still try to use gas prices as a reason to elect them or conversely not to elect their opponent. And, of course, the F150 truck is still an American icon.
    
     But I am optimistic that the American public is becoming more attuned to the need to conserve our fossil fuels. Few now debate whether climate change is real and more are now saying what can be done about it. Government regulation, hopefully, will force industries and power companies to clean up their mess. And as a car dealer, I am glad that the feds have forced car makers to make more fuel efficient vehicles.
    
     Will we ever change to be more like the Europeans -- with their tiny cars, extensive network of high-speed trains, jammed subways and urban bike paths?    I doubt it.    As a Ford dealer, I still want the Ford F150 to remain our country's best-selling vehicle. But maybe, just maybe I will live long enough to see it get 50 miles per gallon. That, indeed, would make it very European. Nothing would make me prouder than seeing our Ford pickups buzzing through the streets of Paris.


Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Indian River Emergency

Many of my fellow business owners often gripe about the taxes they pay, the federal and state regulations they must follow and how government should just get out of their way.

I take a different approach. I don't mind paying taxes. Among other things, the money is needed for roads, bridges, fire and police protection, Medicare, Social Security and a safer net for the poor. I want to make sure the drinking water I am drinking, the food I eat and the drugs I must take are safe. And I know a well educated population is needed for a democracy to survive. So for the past two decades as the owner of Sunrise Ford, I have dutifully signed substantial checks to the IRS, State of Florida, St. Lucie County and the City of Fort Pierce. But this year I am fed up with the Feds, the state and the South Florida Water Management District. They cannot come up with a game plan - and successfully implement it - To protect the Indian River Lagoon and the Caloosahatchee estuary.

For years, billions and billions of gallons of polluted water from Lake Okeechobee have been flowing into the two estuaries, ruining our waterways, while the politicians and bureaucrats keep making excuses on why nothing can be done.

Not my jurisdiction, says Florida Gov. Rick Scott. We don't have the money, say the Republican members of Congress. Worse yet, the state this year approved a 30 year lease to Big Sugar to continue to farm the land that should be used to restore the Everglades, which would naturally filter the water from Lake Okeechobee. And big Sugar, which has enjoyed the perfectly drained land and federal price support for decades, says the plan to restore the Everglades will never work.

Finally, this week the South Florida Water Management may be able to take the first step, albeit a small one, to begin cleaning up the Indian River Lagoon. The board voted to support the Army Corps of Engineers' proposal to divert 65 billion gallons of polluted lake Okeechobee water from St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee estuaries to property south of the lake.

But there is a hitch but it's hard for me to fathom. If the water management board supports the proposal on Thursday, it's still must go through public reviews, final report from the Corps, another review from state and federal agencies and then sent to Congress for the consideration. The reviews, reports and other bureaucratic red tape can take as much as 255 days. If the proposal is not sent to Congress by the end of the year, it will be put on hold for seven more years.

Why this is coming up in the 11th hour is beyond me. If this proposal is not put on a fast track, embattled estuary is doomed to another seven years of severe pollution, causing the seagrasses to continue to disappear, fish and wildlife to die at alarming rates, and the health advisories forbidding contact with the water to be a permanent fixture on the Treasure Coast. The 65 billion gallons that will be diverted are just a small percentage of the 469 billion gallons that are sent to the estuaries, but this is a start.

These horrific conditions are nothing new so there is no excuse for the foot dragging. Gov. Scott, Congressman Patrick Murphy, and State Representative Larry Lee should join State Sen. Joe Negron in trying to untangle the current bureaucratic mess and not only get this current proposal implemented, but the funding for a long-term solution on the books.

Part of Sunrise Ford's success is its location in South Florida with its unique Lagoon that  attracts tourists and new residents every year. There is no disputing the Indian River fuels economic growth for a myriad of businesses, which all pay taxes. Unlike some of my Tea Party friends, who would just as soon do away with most taxes in much of the government, I know government action is needed to clean up the mess in the Indian River. Since I took over Sunrise Ford in 1994, the company has paid millions in federal taxes, generates about $130,000 a month in state taxes and sent at least $20,000 to the South Florida Water Management District. I will gladly continue to pay these taxes --- But all I want now is the government agencies who have received these large sums to do what is right for the Indian River and do it right now.


Wednesday, July 3, 2013

Battling Cancer & Big Health Insurance Companies

As a cancer survivor and a business owner, I thought the affordable healthcare act could be both a blessing and a burden. When I was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2010 and faced costly treatments, one of my big worries was losing my health insurance and having a pre-existing condition that would not be covered under a new plan.

Indeed, Blue Cross Blue Shield did increase Sunrise Ford's premiums at what I felt were exorbitant rates. The company forced me to put additional employees on the plan, even though they could not afford the premiums. I had undergone a double mastectomy, completed 8 very toxic chemotherapy sessions and was sitting outside of Good Samaritan Hospital in West Palm Beach waiting for one of 32 radiation treatments when I had to once again haggle With Blue Cross Blue Shield over rate increases.

I was fully aware that my treatments were not only painful---but also very expensive. So I knew our group health plan would suffer, right along with me. At Sunrise Ford, employees pay for half of the cost of the premium for themselves and/or their family. The company pays the rest.

So the good news with Obamacare was that I could not be dropped from Blue Cross Blue Shield because of my expensive Cancer treatments, nor could I be prevented from using a different company because of a pre-existing condition. What I wasn't sure of is what effect Obamacare would have on my company since Sunrise Ford has more than 50 full-time employees, requiring me provide health insurance.

Since I already provide coverage, I figured it would not make that much difference. But a recent story in Scripps newspaper had me perplexed. Other business owners said they would try to avoid providing insurance by cutting employees hours. The owner of a Vero Beach insurance company said he would rather pay the $2,000 per employee fine rather than offer health insurance.

Too me health insurance is now a necessity. Healthcare costs are now so high it is hard to imagine being able to pay out-of-pocket for a chronic illness, a life-threatening disease or even a few days in the hospital. Healthcare has now taken a toll on our economy from the high cost of Medicare to the prices of providing care to the uninsured. Indeed, the inability to pay in medical bills is the leading cause for bankruptcies in United States.

Right now at Sunrise Ford we have a variety of plans that range from $442 a month for a single employee to as much as $2,246 for the "Cadillac" coverage of a family.

Under Obamacare, I would continue to provide coverage and would be required to provide limited subsidies to lower wage earners. The law says that an employee can't pay more than 9.6% of his or her income for healthcare. So a Sunrise Ford employee earning $20,000 dollars a year would pay a maximum of $1,920 a year. Sunrise Ford would pick up the rest of the tab. A basic insurance plan of $400 a month would cost a total of $4,800 per year. Sunrise would have to pay $2,880 not much more than the $2,000 penalty insurance company owner and Vero Beach was willing to pay. And it's certainly much less than Sunrise Ford is paying now to subsidize those with more expensive plans.

Furthermore, insurance companies now are limited in how much they can hike their rates. And as an employer I can see how much Blue Cross Blue Shield pays each year in expenses and compare that with what Sunrise Ford pays in premiums---which I learned this summer was a great bargaining tool.

Instead of charging a double-digit rate hike as they first proposed, I was able to get them to reduce the rate by 6%. I know it will be years until we know all of the ramifications of Obamacare. But for now I am not that worried. In fact, I can feel nothing but relief that Blue Cross Blue Shield can no longer drop me whenever it wants.


Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Bringing new business to Fort Pierce, and the passing of Mr Ronald Shultz of Shultz Chevrolet

We at Sunrise Ford are pleased to again offer our Quick Lane service on Saturdays, Beginning July 6.

Minor repairs and maintenance work can be done on all makes and models during our Saturday hours, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The Quick Lane service will be provided in the dealership's service drive.

Several months ago, we closed our Quick Lane facility just north of Sunrise Ford in anticipation of putting another franchise in the building. Plans for the renovation of the Quick Lane and construction of a new showroom have stalled, however, because of some red tape involving the state's franchise laws. We do plan on going through with those plans in the near future.

In the meantime, we have done a major renovation of the Sunrise Ford's service drive and added the necessary staff to provide quick lube service and other maintenance work in the dealership. If you haven't been to the service department in a while, please stop by and see our sleek new service drive. I know many of you have been disappointed that we have not been open for service on Saturday so I am glad to be able to provide that convenience again.

Our sales department is also open on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. So when you come in for that Saturday oil change, please feel free to browse through our inventory. Ford Motor Co. is offering some huge rebates or 0 percent financing on many models. There are also some great deals on our Fusion hybrids and Escapes.

Sunrise Ford has been an institution on the Treasure Coast for more that 80 years, and one of the few family owned franchises in the area. On a sad note, we are so sorry about the loss of another dealer whose family has been a fixture in St. Lucie County for decades. Ronnie Shultz, president of Shultz Chevrolet, recently died. Our condolences to his parents, Bill and Louise, his wife Nancy, brothers, children and grandchildren. Ronnie was an example to all of us what a reputable, ethical and caring dealer should be. He was an asset to the community, quietly giving to many causes and charities and helping many in need. Ronnie will be missed by all in the car business, as well as so many of his friends in St. Lucie County.

Monday, May 13, 2013

NatGeo Channels "Fish Tank Kings" & Sunrise Ford team up to build an aquatic masterpiece.


A 1970 vintage Volkswagen bus that was purchased by Sunrise Ford and transformed into a saltwater aquarium will be featured on the National Geographic Channel's “Fish Tank Kings” show on June 1.

Sunrise Ford general manager Mike Wetzel said the VW bus that now showcases coral and fish from the Indian River Lagoon will eventually be installed in a VW dealership. Wetzel came up with the idea after watching the nationally televised show, which showcases aquariums in unique settings. He thought the VW/aquarium would be perfect for VW franchise along the treasure coast.

“It will be something that will draw people into a showroom just to see it,” he said. A beach style motif for a showroom will be the perfect setting for VW bus.

Wetzel track to the 1970 minibus on the Internet and purchased it from a private seller in July 2012. The paint was primer black and the minibus had no ignition key. Needing extensive repairs, the VW barely made the trip to Fort Pierce. When it arrived at Sunrise Ford, bodyshop mechanic Jimmy Catrambone started an extensive restoration. The experts at living color aquariums, located in Fort Lauderdale, also went to work designing  800 plus gallon tank that would be installed behind the front seat all the way to the rear of the vehicle. After months of work, the project was unveiled in January in the showroom at Sunrise Ford.

The tank was filled with colorful coral and a myriad of fish, including juvenile pompano, cobia, lookdowns and stingrays, all indigenous to the Indian River Lagoon or the Atlantic Ocean off the treasure coast.

“We wanted something that would celebrate the wonderful fish and plant life St. Lucie County,” Wetzel said.

After all, St. Lucie County has been a mecca for both anglers and surfers for decades. The VW minibus with a staple at the North Beach jetties in the 1960s and 1970s. “That nostalgic feel would be a perfect fit for VW dealership,” he said.

Dozens of customers and Sunrise Ford employees were on hand when National Geographic filming crews, as well as Living Color Aquarium staffers, unveiled tank. “It was over-the-top,” Wetzel said. “It turned out much better than I imagined.”

The tank was then emptied so that the National Geographic show would be the official “reveal”. Fish Tank Kings will air at 9:00 pm on June 1. The aquarium will then be filled again in July and stocked with an array of fish and coral.

As the owner of Sunrise Ford, I hope that many of our customers and friends will stop in to see this spectacular aquarium. Feel free to sit in the bus and have your picture taken with the beautiful coral and colorful fish in the background. The bus will be at Sunrise Ford until it is relocated to its new home in the VW dealership.